1911, Investiture of the Prince of Wales

The Investiture of Edward (later Edward VIII) as Prince of Wales in 1911 at Caernarfon was based on a mythical reconstruction of a mediaeval ceremony. The Times reported that in the march to the castle, the women of the Welsh choir looked most ‘picturesque in their red cloaks and steeple-crowned hats.’ (The Times, 14.7.1911)

Photograph: The investiture of the Prince of Wales, 13th July, 1911. Women in Welsh hats are just visible in the background. (Cadw collection)

Photograph: Women, probably members of a choir, parading throught a street in Caernarfon, 1911 in preparation for the Investiture of the Prince of Wales. They are all wearing Welsh hats; white lacy shawls; skirts with three horizontal bands near the bottom edge, and cloaks with the hoods not clearly visible. By the time of this event, silk Welsh hats were no longer being made, so some of them may be wearing old hats, while others had cloth-covered card hats especially made, as below. (Cadw collection and Gwynedd Archives, XS3573/8, XS2556/4)

Wesh hat, said to have been made for the Investiture of the Prince of Wales, 1911. Ceredigion Museum, 2007.52.1

 

Wesh hat, said to have been made for the Investiture of the Prince of Wales, 1911.
Ceredigion Museum, 2007.52.1

According to the donor of a doll in Tenby Museum (Doll project number D3), a miniature version of the doll was presented to Lloyd George and another was sent to Buckingham Palace. They were made by Mrs Betsy Watkins, Caretaker of Caernarfon Castle at the time of the Investiture of the Prince of Wales, 1911.

Further reading:

John S. Ellis, ‘The Prince and the Dragon: Welsh National Identity and the 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales’, Welsh History Review, (1996), pp. 272-294;

John S. Ellis, ‘Reconciling the Celt: British National Identity, Empire and the 1911 Investiture of the Prince of Wales’, The Journal Of British Studies, vol 37, no 4 (October 1998), pp. 391-418